The Interview with Roger Love

The World's #1 Voice Coach

                        &

The Voice Coach for Hollywood Stars

He has helped stars such as:

Bradley Cooper ( A Star is Born)

Reese Witherspoon (Walk the Line)

Joaquin Phoenix (Walk the Line)

Jeff Bridges (Crazy Heart)

Angelina Jolie

Colin Farrell

Al Pacino

Steve Carrell

John Mayer

Gwen Stefani

Maroon  5

Nick Jonas

Jennifer Lopez

Stevie Wonder

The Jacksons and the list goes on...

  • To access the discount on for the Voice of Healing for Health Care Professionals goto www.rogerlove.com/lalit and enter Promo Code HEAL to get a $100 discount at the checkout.

  • To access the discount on for the Perfect Voice Collection goto www.theperfectvoice.com/buy and enter the Promo Code VOICE to get the $50 discount 

With Colin Farrell

On a Personal Note:

It's been a long time since I've met someone who has taught me something that has been tremendously groundbreaking. Many feel that way once they spend some time with Roger.  Roger has broken so many myths about communication that people are simply unaware of. His teachings will change the way you think about using your voice and how you influence people.

I make no apology as to how important I think his work is I've seen so many people's lives transformed from his teachings. There is a reason people are in tears when they realize they can sound, connect and be better because of their newly learned skill.

Roger knows how to be kind to people as he helps them find their true voice. It's not easy to be criticized and to move forward, but with Roger, you feel safe. What's crazy is that his systems create massive results easily, and that's what is the most surprising thing I discovered when working with him.

If you listen to one podcast this year, this should be the one, it will change your life for the better. It is time exceptionally well spent!  I'm sure you will enjoy this interview with my good friend Roger Love.

Lalit Chawla

The Interview

This interview was dictated to close as possible to the actual conversation, however, there may be errors in the dictated process. Capturing the intentions and emotions through words to reflect the conversation can be incomplete).

In this sit down interview, he teaches why and how our voice is pivotal in influencing the way we connect with people, especially to our loved ones and patients. This is an interview that will change the way you speak, and I strongly recommend his work and teachings. Roger breaks apart so many myths, and we cover such as:

 

  • How and why our voice pulls or pushes people toward you or away from you

  • You are not the voice you’re born with. You can change your voice easily

  • The Different Voice Types

  • Common Simple mistakes people make when speaking and how to correct it

  • How to use pitch, pace, tone, melody and volume correctly when you speak

  • How we’ve destroyed the English Language and how to fix it

  • How to use periods and commas when speaking (this point is a big one)

Roger also shares with me some of his very personal struggles. Things he doesn’t share with too many people. Please enjoy my interview with my good friend Roger Love. 

Lalit:
Roger, I am excited to be back here in Hollywood with you and it's really awesome. I want to start off by saying that, you're one of the few people I've ever met that really changes the way people communicate - it's like we've discovered an extra sense like sight, sound, and you help people learn how to use their voice to connect with people. I certainly want to talk about the, all the tools, tips, and tactics that you teach a little later on. But I want to start off really by asking you, because I know you're one of the hardest working people I know in Hollywood, and you have a tremendous heart and, and dedication. But I, I want to ask you: where did you get that drive? Because I know you weren't always affluent; , I remember we had this conversation and I was wondering if you could speak to that.

Roger Love:
First of all, thank you for all the nice things you've already said about me and no, I was not affluent. I remember as I got older, I saw the mortgage payment bill for my parents' house and they had lived there their whole lives. I think their mortgage bill was like $17 a month and they paid on that mortgage for 30 years, $17 a month, 20 something a month. It was a very humble beginnings for me. My father worked, never missed a day in his life, was never late a day in his life, but he was really just more of a laborer. He wasn't a thought leader. So he went and did an honest work - every day. He never was late and got an honest small paycheck.

When I was 13 I really wanted to take singing lessons because the only thing I cared about being, other than my family, was singing because I realized at an early age, if ever I was unhappy, I could open my mouth and sing and that would totally change everything. It would make me so happy and so confident. So at 13 I finally begged my mother to please get me singing lessons because I, I knew I wanted to make voice and sound and singing a career-a lifetime because it made me happy. So she wasn't working, she was just taking care of me and my two brothers. And so she had to get a job and work five days a week just to pay for two -half an hour voice lessons! Yeah, a week with my teacher! So I saw how hard my father was working. I saw how hard my mother was working just to pay for the two lessons that I needed for voice a week; with those hardworking role models, of course I was going to feel like I always had to work for everything. And if it was easy, it meant that I wasn't working hard enough.

 

Lalit:
Nice. Yeah, I remember us having that conversation. You know, I want to ask you about a conversation we had, after dinner after one of your events across the Zipper theater. And I, I don't know if you remember your answer because you have attained a level of success. You've worked with the best superstars in Hollywood,: the speakers, Tony Robbins, Susan Armand, and recently with Bradley Cooper and beautiful movies too- A Star is Born. Jeff Bridges, Reese Witherspoon. It's probably easier for me to name the people you haven't worked with. Everybody calls on you to help them with their voice. But one thing, I don't know if everybody knows about this, is that - here's the question I asked you. You know- because you're helping a lot of people who don't have notoriety, like the average people like myself, other people. And I asked you "Why do you do what you do? How come you're helping so many other people, and not...and why do you do those programs and events? And do you remember the answer you gave me that day?


 

Roger Love:
Well, I'm going to give you the answer that's in my heart and hope it was as good as the answer I gave you that day because it's true. I taught singers for 17 years as a voice coach and that was great-Amazing! Superstar singers were coming to me and I could help them sing higher and lower and sell more records, more tee shirts and more concert events and that's fine. But then I started working with the speaking voice and I realized that it was fun to help people find a good voice. But then if I could help people use their voice to become great people, that was a whole different thing.


When speakers started coming to me, I realized it was bigger than just going higher and lower and selling more records. It was... I could help people speak and showcase the best of themselves and change their lives, their business-wise and personal-wise. So that finding their voice, when they didn't have one, finding a voice that could communicate the best of themselves to the world, it really changed lives. And I started really appreciating being a part of that transformation as being often times more valuable to me and to the society at large. To help somebody find their voice and then change their world and maybe change the whole world a little bit more.

Lalit:
Yes I mean it's phenomenal, where your heart is to help "the average manor woman."

Roger Love:
I say that I have just a little dream, and I feel it's absolutely attainable, and that is, I have to save the world- and the only way I can do it is : one voice at a time; by making everyone's voice sound better, by being able to communicate openly, authentically, truthfully, emotionally. Because if I figure that I can make everybody sound better than at least I'm making the world sound better, but if they also could share the same emotional, authentic sounds, then we could break down barriers. It doesn't make any difference where you're from and that we're different. I'm taller or shorter or I speak with an accent or I don't, or I have these religious beliefs or I have these political beliefs. It's like- let's just make sounds that are real heartfelt and then I, I think I can make the world better because of that.

Roger Love:
Yes. That was all started from just me being in school; being overweight, because I couldn't exercise for those number of years, and trying to find some way of making any of the girls, let alone the girls that were good looking, any of the girls. I would've taken any attention whatsoever. I would say from the teacher on down to parents at school, people, whatever. So I would just try to be funny in class to try to get some attention. Like, Oh, you're so cute or, that's funny. So I used that. I didn't realize till later as I started to teach, that I could teach much more effectively and faster by making the environment of each lesson fun. So it wasn't coming to a lesson with me and, and somebody was gonna be cracking your knuckles on a keyboard or telling you you're doing everything wrong. I would create an environment of fun and laughter and people would love coming to the lessons. And I realized that when they learn through humor that they learn multiple times faster. So I wasn't just being, a goof off or what I call myself a sit down comedian, because most of my humor started at being at the piano teaching lessons. The bottom line is I realized that I could teach more effectively by having a light air where anything was possible. And lots of things were funny.

 

 

Lalit:
But you know, it goes back to what we've talked about before is that, to become better at something, you have to try. Like lot of jokes fail. A lot of things fail. Sometimes you have to come up with a hundred bad ideas before you come up with a good one. And you find that similar in other areas such as in speaking, in songwriting,...

Roger Love:
in everything, I was the number two voice coach in the world early on in my life and the only reason that I was number one is because the partner who brought me into the practice was the number one. And he was 65 years old and I was 20. So I realized that I got to be a really good singing coach, but then speakers started coming to me like Tony Robbins and Jeff Bridges; speakers who just wanted to use their speaking voice. Actors and very famous speakers. And I didn't in the beginning. I turned them away because I said, 'I'm a singing coach.' But then I realized as they kept coming, they were so interesting and these people had the ears of millions of people. And I said, why shouldn't I help them with their voices? If they were having problems or I could make it better? So there was no content for me to teach them. I created all of the content for how to train a speaking voice from scratch, from spending 17 years as a singing coach.


I realized after I'd studied and worked and tried this method and tried that method, that there really isn't much of a difference between singing and speaking. And when I came to that conclusion, it blew the roof off of the ability to create new content. Then I was able to teach my speakers how to influence and move people emotionally - the same way that I had taught my singers. Singers are great at moving people emotionally. You go to a concert, you're at one moment you're laughing, the next moment you're crying, the next moment you're standing up on the chair shouting "woo woo woo"; and you're not even a woo woo kind of guy. You're standing up on the chair and everybody's looking at you thinking you're crazy because you're older than everyone else. But singers can really move people emotionally. So, I realized I could do the same thing. Show people how to make sounds that were authentic and move them emotionally. And it wasn't until years later that science caught up with me. They said the only way to actually communicate with someone, so that it goes into their brain, so that they process the information that they remember what you say is to communicate emotionally. And the brain doesn't think that words are emotions. If I say to you, (in a flat tone)"Hey, I want you to meet my brother tomorrow, he's fine." Then your brain goes like, "what? You're talking to me?" But if I say (excited tone) "I want you to meet my brother tomorrow, he is fine." Then your brain says, "how about lunch?" So, I always say nowadays that science made an honest man of me because science is now supporting everything I've been saying for the last 30 years.

Lalit:
You know, one of the things amazing for me to watch is how you've transformed people. You have a real gift as a life coach, not just at the voice coach; how you reframe things. One thing many people don't know, and I hope you're fine talking about this, is that when you were young, you had a significant physical disability where you couldn't walk. How did you deal with that? It didn't get you down.



Roger Love:
I was down for a minute, but then you have to get back up. You have to decide if you really like the view from down or whether you want to get your head out of the gutter and look up. When I was 10 I was diagnosed with osteomyelitis, which not a big deal now. They have a arthroscopic surgery now and they go in they make little incisions, but back then they cut the whole leg open. I have a scar and an incision about this long all the way down my whole leg. They took out tumors and then I had to have other surgeries from issues that were caused by opening it up, and other tumors and other situations. But basically I was out of commission, walking, from the time I was 10 and still limping by the time I was 16.


I had to go to a handicapped school because I couldn't walk and because I was in a wheelchair for a year or so and then a non walking cast. But what I learned from that of course is that you certainly can't be winning all the time. But I learned that it's actually because I wasn't out there, even meeting people, it was all voice. I would get up out of bed, I would wheel myself over to the desk and I would go to school- not physically at a handicapped school but over the phone. So my only interaction, even going to school all day was over the phone to the school! And so it was really that I was creating a life for myself with my voice, even in my darkest physical times because it was voice that I was using to connect to everything outside of my bedroom and my wheelchair. And then as I grew up, I used voice to rebuild my life again. Suddenly I'm in high school and I don't know anybody because I'm new to high school. I start using my voice; singing and speaking to bring those people into my life that also likes singing. And I rebuilt my life from scratch in my teens using my voice.

Lalit:
You also used humor, one thing many people, unless they know you, is how funny you are. So you used that also to improve your connection, didn't you?

 

Roger Love:
I forget the exact statistic, but you know, they say communication is 58% body language, 7% words, but what is it, 38% tonality And volume is determines the way we connect with people. And that's an area which people do not know how to use much at all. And, and you bring that! You bring that to everything when people are speaking; I've seen that. We're going to talk about that in a second.


I want to talk about the concept of introverts and extroverts, because I think there's a big myth around that. I just want to get your thoughts on this. You've worked with celebrities, singers who are out there entertaining people.

With Selena Gomez

 

Even looking at you, you've talked in front of 8,000 people at the biggest and then several hundred and then 20 and then one on one- there's a whole gamut. Now knowing you and everybody would say you're an extrovert, but I know you (that's not necessarily true). What's your experience with celebrities? Introvert, extrovert. Can you comment on that?
 

Roger Love:
Sure. Every major superstar that I have ever worked with is an introvert. I believe one of the reasons people go into show business- singing, dancing, acting, is because you're an introvert. And, and yet you have all of these emotions and feelings and ideas and thoughts and colors and pictures inside of your head. So you create other parts of your personality because you feel trapped inside of just being an introvert. So a Bradley Cooper, who may have been very, very shy and an introvert when he was younger, realizes that he can act and take these other characters that he's not responsible for. He's not responsible for what his characters do in a movie. It's in the script. He's not responsible for those words and yet he can act out those emotions and it's so freeing to be different characters. So the truth is I believe we are all an interesting mixture of introvert and extrovert and some people as an introvert take longer to recharge their batteries so they need more time to recharge their batteries. I'm very- I'm the introvert who is very good at charging his battery fast, so I can be around a ton of people. I can speak for 9,000 people and a half an hour before I was in the back room recharging my battery and I can recharge it maybe in about five minutes if I have to full charge and then back out. So it's just I've become efficient. I realized that it's okay to have multiple authentic parts of your own personality. So I'm an extrovert all day at work teaching. I come home and on the weekends with my family, I'm much more of an introvert. They're also full of life. And I really just want to listen and experience their joys and enthusiasms. So I become quiet on the weekends. I'm the least noisy one in the house. And then I experience my family by listening and watching them and listening to them sing, talk and dance. So I think if all of us realize that it's okay to have parts of our personality that are introverted and parts that are extroverted and to use those authentic parts of our personality when we need them so that we have a full life.

 

 

Lalit:
Yeah, I was very much like an introvert. And when I discovered magic and illusions and performing, and then I developed my stage personality. So it was really a big contrast. And people who knew me personally and they would see the show, they'd say, one guy said, "you're about as interesting as a cardboard box offstage and like, what is it?" So there literally, is a switch in the character or the personality and it becomes enjoyable. So I think when people found out that I said I'm an introvert, they'd say "you're not an introvert!" but it really goes to the level of recharging.

Roger Love:
Yeah. People have to stop apologizing for different parts of their personality that might be smaller or bigger than other parts. They need to embrace those because it is an embracing those different parts of the personality. What I say, giving them a voice will allow them to have the relationships that they want. It will allow them to have the business, the personal relationships to have the success that they want. It allows them to go after their goals that they have in life; which they can't achieve, all of them, if they never find their voice; and they live their whole existence as an introvert, away from other people.

Lalit:
Yes, I wonder, maybe switch gears a little bit, I want to start off by sharing with you with you a story. When my daughter was about five years old. I got a call from one of her friend's mothers and she said, would Saveena like to come over and play with her friend/daughter. And I said, I'll ask her,and I'll call you back. So I go to my daughter and said, "so and so (name of friend) wants you to come over, do you want to go over there?"

"She, says no, Poppa. I don't, I don't really want to go, but she can come here. "I said, why not? " And you know children are honest. And she says, "well, her Mom's she's nice, but her... when she speaks, it's, it's hard to hear. It's, it's a very nasally high pitch, so it's kind of scary. And sometimes she interacts with us so I don't even...I don't like hearing her voice."


And I was like, "Oh really?" So, and then it really got me thinking that. So for whatever reason, whether A was she aware of the effect that she was having on people because maybe there was a lack of awareness. Second is that the fact is that she may thinks, I can't change my voice. And you, Roger, break those myths big time. So I was wondering if we could leap into that?

The Doctors

 

Roger Love:
Sure. I love saying that "you are not the voice you were born with" because most people as they get to be adults, young adults or older adults, they open up their mouths and they think that's what mother nature gave them-and that's the voice they were born with. And I say that's SO not true. You were born with an instrument. Like your grandmother gave you a piano and it's sitting in your living room and now you decide how to use that instrument. So with voice, when we're born, we start imitating the sounds of the people that are in our environment. So if my mother speaks really airy (Roger is talking like Marilyn Monroe, very soft like) all of the time and I really like breast milk. I'm going to, as soon as I can make sounds, because I really want milk- and I want to connect with my mother because I'd like to survive and eat. So as soon as I can make a sound, I was like, "mommy hungry mommy" (similar to airy Marilyn Monroe).

I speak airy and let's say my dad talks like-"he's got a lot of rasp in his voice and maybe he's a lumberjack or whatever, and it sounds like this" (Roger speaking in a raspy harsh voice) and I want my dad to to carry me all the time. Well, then as soon as I can speak to my dad and be like, "Aug, daddy up picked me up," (Roger speaking in a raspy harsh voice) because I think that's how he communicates. And if I sound like him, maybe we'll be closer together. So we grow up imitating the voices that are in our environment. Suddenly we're adults and we think that's our voice. But that's just the voices that we imitated. And I say, anytime you want, today, no matter what age you are, here's the sounds you're making. Here are different sounds that you could be making. Whose voice do you love? Do you love to listen to this person's speak? Do you love to listen to this person sing? Because if you learned a better technique, on how to create all those sounds that are possible, you can sound however you want. I say I was born with an instrument, but I couldn't find in my crib, the instruction manual. I didn't, none of my friends at preschool had the instruction manual and I kept waiting for it to show up at home, but it never did. So eventually I just wrote it.

Lalit:
Yes. Well, you know, the biggest myth is that it's hard work, but I hope this doesn't come across incorrectly, but the tools, tips and tactics that you give are actually simple and effective. And I think that's why you were able to make amazing changes. Especially when people come on stage or you're working with them and, I think that's the biggest revelation, I think for people, "Oh, I got to spend hours and hours on this. I've got to quit my job to change my voice. That's not true, is it?



 



Roger Love:
No, you can change your voice in minutes. If you can't go high, you can learn how to go high in minutes. If he can't go low. The same thing. If you're soft, you could easily be loud. If you're nasal, you could easily lose the nasal. One of my favorite things to do, whether I'm speaking to a few hundred people or 9,000 people, is I take my microphone. I walk out in the middle of the audience.


I did this the other day at Forbes. I was the keynote speaker for the Forbes leadership summit, and here are all men and women in suits and ties. I mean all PhDs, multiple PhDs, all super successful, all big CEOs, all affluent and very learned. These are the top educators and business people in the world. From Steve Forbes on down. Me with my little microphone walking around from table to table, doing vocal transformation. Stand up. Let's listen to your voice now let's change it. And people freak out on how fast I can make a change. And they also freak out on the idea that what you sound like is how everyone perceives you. So somebody gets up and they have multiple PhDs, they're CEOs, they're millionaires. They have what you think, they're at the top of life's game and they sound really nasal like that, which makes it sound funny. Like it's a character voice and they're not the leading man or leading lady in their own life! And then they just think they were born with that, and that's making people perceive them as kind of weak and like a minor character. And then I show them how to lower their Adam's Apple in the nasality goes away, boom! And they, they're perceived as healthy and stronger and more powerful. So little tiny tweaks in seconds can change the way that everyone perceives you.

Lalit:
And the airy voice, you know? Can you give me an example of that?

Roger Love:
Yeah, everyone's voice in the world, in history is different than everyone else's voice. That's what's amazing. If I call you tomorrow and you only had this interview, now we know each other, we have a relationship; but if you had just met me today and I call you on the phone tomorrow and I'm like "Lalit, you want to have lunch?" You'd be like, "Roger, did I give you my cell phone?" Because you'd recognize my voice. Your family and your best friends do not have to call and say "hello Lalit, it is me, Johnny your best friend." And you're like, "yeah Johnny, I know you're my best friend. I know what you sound like." Right? So everyone's voice is different on the planet and yet everyone fits into about five or six, what I call voice types that are at least similar to other people. And one of them is what I call the Marilyn Monroe voice type. This voice of air thinking that, and this voice is also very prevalent in the healthcare profession, because doctors, nurses and healthcare practitioners think if I just speak with more air, it'll make people think that I care more. (Roger speaking very Airy, like Marilyn Monroe) "I'm here for you. Lalit. You're my patient, you're my coworker. Don't you hear the air and don't you feel the compassion?" And yet air is not the only way to sound compassionate, caring, loving or understanding. Airy sounds, when they come out of your mouth, they dissipate in the air and then they hardly ever even get to the people that you're talking to. And they make you sound weak, not powerful, not strong. I don't want my healthcare professionals to sound airy. I want them to sound compassionate and strong because I have a problem and I need care. But I need care from someone who is strong, knowledgeable, positive and confident and not airy. Nobody thought Marilyn Monroe was confident. They just thought she was beautiful. No confidence.



Lalit:
I've seen medical residents and other physicians, where the patient doesn't even hear them because of all of that airiness. I think there's a lot of misconceptions in terms of how healthcare professionals connect because a lot of the patients are going to be elderly, so there's going to be a hearing deficit. And there's bells and whistles going on left and right in a hospital setting.


I've recently had the good fortune to be speaking at the Mayo clinic and I've also been to many conferences and we've all seen presenters- they could be talking about the most exciting thing or the most important thing in the world but if it's just that monotone voice, they put you in a trance. And I remember at different times trying to shake my head, because I was zoning out, and I was like, "ah, this is interesting or important information, but why can't I concentrate? For the longest time I thought it was me, but it's not. Do you want to talk about that monotone voice? It was one of the greatest teachings/lessons I learned from you.

Roger Love:
Okay. Yes. Let's talk about monotone. Let's also say that I don't think people realize that voice and communication is a physical connection. So when I say "I want to connect with you" I don't just mean I want you to hear what I say, and having problems because this person's elderly or there's a lot of noise going on or that person is sick and not feeling well and really focused on pain as opposed to audible cues. But actually sound is supposed to come out of your mouth when you speak and it's supposed to go far enough away from you that it vibrates the bodies of the people that are close to you. And if it doesn't vibrate their bodies, they really can't process the information. It isn't just about them hearing it, it's about them feeling the vibrations. And this isn't some 'woo woo' speaking. This is all scientific. Invisible sound waves are supposed to vibrate the bodies of people. So when you speak to someone, you literally are physically connected with them. So most of the voices,that airy voice, it doesn't get to people. They can't hear you, but they can't feel you because you're not vibrating.


Also sounds like monotone. It's like we were born as pianos but with one note. So we just have one note as if I was hitting one note on the piano over and over and over. Here's me excited, here's me sad, here's me angry or I just get a little louder but I just stay on the same note. And when I show people monotone, which is so boring and people should fall, people deserve to fall asleep. If somebody saying like this, when I show him (they are speaking) monotone, they say to me "Roger, I don't do that. No, no, no, no, I don't do that. That's so not me." And then I say let's record you. Then I record them with my little smart phone, which we all have in our pockets; amazing, fabulous recording devices. Which we should use to listen to the way that we sound back, because sound coming towards us sounds different than sound going away from us. So most people have no idea what they sound like-sound coming towards them. So I have them record their voices and here's what most of them do. Monotone, monotone, monotone. And then every so often they're like, okay, here's another note. And then they go back to monotone. Monotone. Same notes, same note, same note, same note. But now I'm excited. Same note same note. So maybe there are two notes on a piano. Your average person may be has three notes on a piano, but there's 88 keys on a normal piano. 90 keys on a Bosendorfer piano because one German composer said, "how could I be contained with 88? I need 90 to go a little bit lower to hit the boom, boom, boom for this one symphony. Anyways, yeah, monotone, airy. We create sounds that are boring to listen to. So people tune us out because we're not really that good of sound coming towards them anyways.

 

Roger Love:
Yeah. The words themselves, really have almost no meaning emotionally. It's the sounds you attach to them. When you have a word like beautiful and it sounds beautiful. It makes you think of things. When you just say, that person is beautiful (without expression). You're thinking "how beautiful could they be? They're not beautiful." They're not beautiful! (Now Roger says the following sentence in a very flat tone-role playing to characters) "I like you. You want to get married?" (response) No, I don't want to get married to you. You don't love me. (reply) I love you.(response) Really. You don't sound like you love me. Lalit, I love you. Tell me how you really feel. (Now more enthusiastically to demonstrate the importance of tonality in a conversation) I love you. You're beautiful.

 

Lalit:
Yeah, they don't use the melody. And you know, one of the greatest teachings that I learned from you, and I actually share with people, is how we use or don't use ascending melodies. You know, we get to the period that it's like, I love you. It is good to see you, but really we should be ascending. Do you want to talk about that again?

Roger Love:
Sure. We've learned melody and attached it to punctuation as we grow up, for sure in America. Different parts of the world have some variation on this, but let's say that classic American English, has attached falsely melody and grammar, which means we were taught, when we get to a comma, we go down - that we go to a lower note and we get softer. So every time we get to a comma, we go down to a low note and softer. And when we get to a period, same thing. Now, I'm speaking and I get to a period and I go down or softer or both. And the only time I'm told by my elementary school teachers that I could possibly go up, that the melody could go up, is if I get to a question Mark. Is that your dog? This is a question, I can finally go up. So here we've attached grammar to melody, but can you imagine what Mozart or any composer would have said if you would've said, "yo, Mozart, I'm the King. I pay for your drinking and your piano and carousing. And so stop going up so much. I really want you to go down. Mozart would be like, "no, I go up when the emotion tells me it's supposed to go up and I go down when the emotion tells me it goes down.


Most people when they're speaking, descending scales, going from higher notes to lower ones, like we were taught; it makes people sound sad. It's my birthday, Lalit, you brought me nothing. It's so, okay. So we're making people, we're making ourselves sad and then we're making listeners sad. But if we went up, it's my birthday. Okay, you didn't bring me a present. You're a nice guy. Maybe you'll bring me something next time. I'm just happy with you being here as my present- going up. Not just going up when it's a question mark. To not be afraid to go up, because when you go up, you make people happy when they hear those sounds.

Lalit  
and that's different than up talk or that scooping thing.

Roger Love:
Yes. There's been all these silly articles written by non-musicians about up talk. There's a difference between up talk and going up at the end of sentences. Here's the main difference. When you scoop like this. It's my dog. It's okay. From one note up, it's so scoop - that's up talk. And when you do that, it sounds like you're from the San Fernando Valley, where I grew up, and that's sort of where up talk started. It was credited to Moon Unit Zappa -Frank Zappa's daughter who spoke like that, and that became known as up talk. That's funny. What I say is, as long as you don't scoop, it's amazing. I love chocolate- bad (scooping talk). I love chocolate (ascending at the end of the sentence) I love my wife bad. I love my wife. I love candy. I love school. I love reading. It's just the scooping. That's bad. It's not the going up that's bad.

Lalit:
And that's why so many messages on answering machine are static. It's like (said in a monotone voice with a downward inflection) "hi, you've reached Lalit Chawla. I'll get back to you if I think about it. " It's  just so monotone. It's like, "Oh, this this person. So not interested in me."

 

Roger Love:
Yeah. It it's like people are apologizing for their own name, they're like,(in a monotone voice and down inflection at the end) "hi, this is Roger Love." What's the matter with love? Loves fine.

Roger Love:
"Hi. It's Lalit." You're going down. You're saying -I'm so, I'm so depressed about my name. Why would you leave a message? I'm already depressed about being me. (Roger now says it with melody and more inflection) Hi, this is Roger Love. I can't be here right now. Leave me a message and I'll get back to you as soon as I can.

Lalit:
Perfect.

Roger Love:
Okay. You get a lot more messages when you use ascending scales, not descending scales all the time.

Lalit:
Now, the five elements of speaking, you know, pitch, pace, tone, melody, volume. Do you want to touch on any one of those or...

Roger Love:
Yes. I break tonality. Because that report in the 60'a and early 70's that came out said, here's what happens to make you believe anything I say. And they said, when I speak to you, what makes you believe me is maybe 38% tonality maybe seven or 8% the words I say and maybe 55% the physiology, what I'm doing with my eyebrows and what I'm doing with my shoulders and my, my toes-my physicality. All those reports were grossly overrated. And those studies weren't very scientific. But it opened the door to people thinking about how important really is tonality, the sounds you make; and since the 70's every study that has really come out has been more scientifically effectively proven - they say less and less has to do with the physicality; because we've learned to lie with our bodies. So I might be miserable. (Roger taking with happy physical facial physiology) I'm like, "I'm so happy to see, you Lalit. Today's the best day of my life. Sit down you want a glass of water?" But I'm faking it, I might be miserable inside. I've put a smile on my face. So you can't trust somebody based on physicality. And we've certainly learned to lie with our words. So you can't believe somebody when they're like, "Lalit, you're my best friend." And, I know you're thinking, well, 'isn't your wife your best friend?' I'm like, "yeah, yeah, Lalit, my wife's my best friend. “So we've learned to lie with words when we think that helps us in some crazy way. So you can't believe words all the time and you can't believe physicality. But what is truthful is the sounds you make-tonality. But nobody was talking about what does that mean? Tonality? Louder, softer, higher, lower. So I broke it down into pitch, pace, tone, melody and volume. Those are the components that comprise tonality. And I've spent my years as a speaking voice coach, aside from everything that I do with singers, helping people understand about pitch, pace, tone, melody and volume. Volume. Let's just pick one because we just pick melody. When you're doing all those descending scales, you sound depressed and then you're making other people unhappy. Maybe even physically sick hearing this. So that's melody. But volume is what people are afraid of as well because we've learned to associate volume with anger. (Roger in a Loud tone) Lalit, I said it was my birthday. Where's the present?" So I get louder, you think I'm angry. So people are afraid of getting louder because they think as soon as they get louder, they're gonna come across as angry. And nobody likes being perceived as angry so people don't get loud. But what they don't understand is with pitch, pace, tone, melody and volume, which is what I call the building blocks of voice. You've gotta mix, some. So if you get louder with no melody, you sound angry. But if you get louder with melody, you sound so happy and so sure of yourself and so confident. So it isn't volume. That's a problem. It's volume with no melody.

Lalit:
Yup. And volume used correctly is equal to enthusiasm too, right? I mean, who wants to be around somebody who's not enthusiastic? When you see that, do you just like, "I love that person. Don't know why, but...."

Roger Love:
You're just never going to follow anyone into battle who's like (very softly spoken) "Oh, now let's go forward. Bayonets. Ready? Let's go. You're questioning "Now? Are you sure? Now? (softly) Let's go. Yeah. Fight. (Questioning tone) "Are you sure? Maybe I'd rather, maybe we should wait."

Lalit:
Yeah. Well, and that just goes to the value of words. You know, people think words are the most important, but it's how you express the words that really matter.

 

Roger Love:
Yeah. The words themselves, really have almost no meaning emotionally. It's the sounds you attach to them. When you have a word like beautiful and it sounds beautiful. It makes you think of things. When you just say, that person is beautiful (without expression). You're thinking "how beautiful could they be? They're not beautiful." They're not beautiful! (Now Roger says the following sentence in a very flat tone-role playing to characters) "I like you. You want to get married?" (response) No, I don't want to get married to you. You don't love me. (reply) I love you (response) Really. You don't sound like you love me. Lalit, I love you. Tell me how you really feel. (Now more enthusiastically to demonstrate the importance of tonality in a conversation) I love you. You're beautiful.


 

 

Lalit:
Recently I heard a speaker, and you talk about this, (the pause, periods and commas) because this person was speaking so fast and boom, boom, boom, boom, boom. Just rifffling through, they were literally reading from the script and it was hard to listen to, you know? And that is an incredible piece of information. The pause. Do you want to talk about that?

Roger Love:
Sure. We have, basically, our generation, has destroyed the American language because they don't understand that there has to be silence at the pauses. So they've added all of these horrible fillers. "Um, uh, like". Some of the new ones annnnnnd which they think is a word, but, "and" when you stretch it out is just as bad as, um. It's just happens to be "and." So what's supposed to happen when you speak, you're supposed to say a handful of words and then stop- comma= silence. And then you're supposed to say another handful of words and stop comma, =silence. You stopped because you can take a breath. You stop, and you have silence, for the main reason to let the person process what you just said. You, they need time to hear the words and see how they feel about them. But instead, we say a bunch of words and we talk about this and then we say, "um," and then we say a bunch more words and then we say "Uh". So I say "I really like red, Um, I really like yellow, Um, and I really like green Um." And you're just trying to figure "out what's green Um and how is green Um different than red or yellow um?" Instead if I was doing what I was supposed to, "I really like red. I really like yellow. I also love green." Then every time I stop, "I really like red" silence. Breath. Your thinking "red, I like red, red's okay, red's fine. You know, it's the color of blood, but if you didn't have any blood, you wouldn't be alive." I "really like green" and you're thinking "green? what's green? grass is green, money's green. It's just anything that pops to your head. "I only like yellow. You think" I don't really like yellow as much as I was like, green." It's just anything that engages. So I say that those pauses are, are the lifeblood of a sentence. And your ability to actually connect with people. Stop silence, take a breath, let them process it and then jump back into your sentence.

Lalit:
In medical school I used to think that I was slow, because some professors never used to stop at those periods and commas. I didn't realize the value of it. And fortunately, people beside me said," you know, I didn't quite catch it either." And I was like, "okay, good. It's not only me." But that's probably one of the biggest things speakers could improve upon, is to pause, because you do need to process that information for that second.

Roger Love:
Yes, I totally agree. Healthcare professionals, doctors and nurses. They have to memorize a lot of stuff. There are some that say it's even impossible to get through medical school or dental school or any kind of a discipline like that, unless you're really good at memorizing. So you got to read a lot, you got to memorize a lot. You got to know a lot of facts. You walk into someone's office, you're there to diagnose issues and problems. There's a lot of facts, figures, thoughts and histories and medications and treatments running through your head. So what happens, is too much of the time, you just sound like; how healthcare professionals sound= like encyclopedias of information. That it's just they're holding back the emotion because they don't want to make the person get too hopeful ,if it's not hopeful; or too sad, if it's bad. They don't want the responsibility of moving the patient that much emotionally. They're just trying to keep equilibrium. And they have all these facts rolling around in their head, so they just sound like they're reading things, as if they were just reading reports. But they try to stay removed from the patients. Even doctors and healthcare professionals that have a lot of personality, mistakenly think that their job in communicating with patients and with their teams and other doctors is to maintain equilibrium. Not to let anyone get too excited or have any emotion that's dramatic because in dramatic emotions, people, they think people make bad decisions or they make decisions based on emotions, or they get really happy or really sad and they just, they don't want to take the responsibility. It's like everything they say is just to keep from getting too emotional. And that's not the way that I like my doctors to communicate or any of my healthcare professionals.

 

Lalit:
You've worked and you've helped a lot of healthcare professionals to improve their connection with patients and their colleagues and even personally, once they learn how to use their voice. A lot of physicians, they may have a lot of empathy and they may have a lot of desire to connect, but they just don't, (they have the why) they don't know the how to. You do that. Now what are some other things that doctors or healthcare professionals do that they could improve on?

Roger Love:
Yeah, they, based on the way that health care insurances and how many patients a doctor has to see to even make the business break even, let alone profitable; so that all of these healthcare professionals are filled on a daily basis with people, only paying small amounts, or they're trying to fight to get the money from the insurance companies. So, what happens is they walk into every communication thinking they are already behind schedule. If you started every communication that you have thinking you don't really have time to listen and make the other person feel heard, not just say things, you'd rush through everything. You'd say everything faster. You'd say everything in a monotone. Just, this is what needs to happen. This is what you need to know. Here's the results of the tests, but you don't have time to actually say it emotionally. Slow enough that the people understand and then give them the opportunity to speak to you; so that you've made them understand something. Hopefully feel something and then give them the opportunity to feel heard. Most patients do not feel heard by their healthcare providers. They might find one doctor or one nurse that just spend a little bit of extra time and said, how do you really feel Betsy? And then close their mouths and Betsy spoke for 10 seconds, and that 10 seconds of the healthcare professional not making noise, not thinking about how, how they're already behind schedule. Making Betsy feel that everything that she said was important to them. Made a connection that that made that person seem caring. I think it's slowing down the pace. I think it's using a lot more melody. Like I said, healthcare professionals are afraid to make sounds that make the person think that their diagnosis is all good. So, they'd rather on the cautious side of just say " well, we'll do more tests and don't get too excited. The cancer seems to be arrested right now, but don't get too excited, don't get too excited." And as soon as you -don't get too excited, let's be realistic, you've taken emotions out of the fray. And I know that if I was ever sick, I would want a strong doctor to come in and tell me what's really going on and have a voice that had volume and melody in it. And when he had happy things to say, I know that those were happy things. And when he had things to say that "this was going to be challenging, "those were the serious things then I'd know those were the serious things. And even if he had things to say that we're sad, I'd know what parts were sad, but at least I had to have a good gamut of things. There's good things and there's happy things. There's hopeful things, not just all sad or not just status quo.

 

Lalit:
Yeah. You know, I always say fast is slow and slow is fast. And you see a lot of doctors they’re in and out, with the patient, very quickly, and they’re not really making connections. That's the biggest complaint patients have, that the doctor didn't listen to them. And when you don't feel you've been listened to, there's no trust. There's just no trust at all. So, you really help break that myth too- it's about the connection and it doesn't take longer. It doesn't take any longer, as a matter of fact you're more effective.

Roger Love:
Absolutely. You send someone in, that's not you, to take all of this medical history and they're taking it in a way that there's no way the patient feels like that person cares about them because they're inputting it mostly into a computer. Ever had any seizures, ever had any headaches? Are you contemplating taking your own life? How depressed are you? blah, blah, blah. They're inputting all this stuff and so the person taking the medical report, they're trying to take a lot of information as if they were just taking insurance information. So then then I show up at an office. The first thing I should be greeted with is the person at the desk who's making the appointments - they should smile at me when I walk in. They shouldn't look up and then look back down because they're already got too much on their plate. But most of them, there's no eye contact and there's nothing not even a "good morning." Even if they don't remember my name. "Good morning. How are you?" (Rather in a cold authoritative tone) "Just good morning, please have a seat. We’ll be with you in a second."

Roger Love:
So I'm not getting love, fuzzy, warm, cuddly from the person I walk into the office with. And then usually another person might come to get me and they just say my name, because they don't know me. Well, they could look at the list and they could, they could look at the list and the person who, who took my name in could say, "that's Roger." And they could walk out into the office when it's my time and they could actually come up to me and say, "Roger, come on in." How, good would that make the patient feel? How much more time would that take for the person who signed, to tell the other person that comes to get them. Please go get Roger. Please go get, Lalit. Please go get Sally. And then they come out and they look at me, they look around the room saying "Roger Love, Roger Love, Roger Love. And then I'm like, "that's me. That's my name. That's my number." I'm just a couple of, syllables and some words on a piece of paper. I'm Roger Love. How about they walked out and they looked at me " hi Roger, please follow me. The doctor's going to be ready for you." Yeah, just simple things. And then, so then I didn't feel love when I came in. I didn't feel looked at. They don't have to talk to me. They can just smile at me and I'd sit down and be "Oh, I am so happy to be here. I'll overlook the bad furniture, the fake plants. I'll overlook the bad lighting, the horrible wallpaper- that person smiles at me when I came in. So nice."

Lalit:
Well, some of the best people in the healthcare profession are the ones that are the first contact they have with the patient, and they say (in a kind voice and manner) "you know, Roger, you're here, come on in with me" and you just feel you're going to be taken care of. Hospitals, clinics are very sterile and scary environments. Imagine for children it's not a fun place. So, yes so that's really good advice.

 


Roger Love:
I think it's time for doctors to sound stronger.

Lalit:
And compassionate.

Roger Love:
And compassionate at the same time. And I don't think anyone's really helping them realize what combination of sounds is compassionate, but also strong

Lalit:
Sure. And I think that you hit the nail on the head, because we often think stronger means battle, war, but stronger doesn't. You can be strong, compassionate and empathetic and it's to to combine those two things together. You do that well.

Roger Love:
How much time do you think it takes me to convince a student that they should listen to my opinion about their voice or make a change? As soon as I say it. As soon as I say it, they're like, "Oh yeah, let's try that, I'm in." And then when they make the sound, they're like, "Oh, yah, that is better." But they didn't doubt me because I don't present my content as doubt-able. I don't present wishy, washy. I present fully committed here, let's do this because I already listened so much as to what they're already doing.

Lalit:
Well, the one thing you do wonderfully well is you are able to help people because most people are afraid of criticism. You do it in a kind way that elevates them and they feel they're in a safe spot. I've seen you do it again and again so often. So that is, I think that's what makes you so you so sought after.

Roger Love:
When somebody like a Bradley Cooper, Reese Witherspoon, Jeff Bridges or Keira Knightley come in for example, they have to sing. My success in getting them to be the star of that movie and sound incredible, if it's singing or, my success in getting anyone to stand up and be the greatest speaker, is that at that first meeting, I make them believe that I can help them. That I absolutely have a road map and that now we're in this together. That together we are going to succeed. That I've done this before. This isn't my first rodeo. It is my ability to make people believe me when I say I know how they can sound land. Then I help them walk with me towards that goal; that I already hear it. When I hear anyone speak, I know what they could sound like. I know who they listened to. I know what their parents sounded like. I know whether they were the ones talking at dinner or whether they were the ones shushed at dinner. I know whether they, were the ones who were magicians or they were the ones out on the street corner with a basket trying to sing songs and make money. You know, they used to say that the eyes were the windows to the soul. And I say, no, it's not. It's nice to look at people's eyes, but the voice is actually the windows to the soul because you can't be feeling something and have it attached to sound and make it fake. It's really easy to tell fake.

 

Lalit:
You can't lie with the voice.

Roger Love:
Sounds in the voice. Don't lie. That's beautifully said.

Lalit:
I think anybody who's ever experienced your work knows that they are working with a professional. Malcolm Gladwell said 10,000-hour rule; you've done this more than anybody. You do it day in, day out. And that's why it's, it's fun to watch you work because you take a person and you know the little thing, the right switch to touch, to the right wire to cut or insert to create a change

Roger Love:
Thank you. And I just think it's time that,- look, you're a man of science. It's time that we all started realizing that voice is a science; and if you're not getting the results you want, if the patients are not listening to you, if your colleagues are not listening, if your staff's not listening to you, it has very little to do with the words you're saying and has everything to do with the sounds that you're making. Because the brain doesn't process spoken communication first for logic, it processes it first for emotion. So it's because you haven't found the sounds that emotionally engage the person.

Roger Love:
I often say you're so smart and you're so smart and you're PhD, PhD, how many books you've read? Thousands and thousands of books. I have clients that if they're not reading two books a week, they think that they're morons. So, they’re always reading. They're always learning. So then I say to these people, okay, pick a book that you've read multiple times that you love. Pick any book. Can you give me 12 sentences, 10 sentences from that book word for word? They say no. Can you give me six sentences from that book word for word? They’re like, uh, no. And then I said, "okay, so you can't, you can't remember the words of that book?" They say "Yeah, no, I can give you general ideas." And then I say, "how many song lyrics do you know? "And then I started naming off songs and they were like, "I know all the song lyrics to that. I know all the words that. The average person knows more than a thousand song lyrics, but can't remember 10 lines of any book that they've ever written. Even even the Bible that they can hardly remember that, sometimes if they're memorizing a particular thing it's unless it is like a song. But the truth is "why is it so easy to remember lyrics when you're not a singer or a composer? The reason is because it's attached to melodies. It's attached to the pitch, pace, tone, melody and volume is created in a way that it gets into your head. It sticks in there and it goes into the permanent part of memory. And that's how we need to learn how to communicate. And I figured that out. So it's my joy to teach people how to communicate in a way that now science says is the only way to effectively communicate with anyone.

Lalit:
Well that's what makes great communicators and great storytellers is they know how to use melody, pitch, pace volume; because communication is to a large degree, telling a story. And so imagine having a story reading little red riding hood and you didn't put the expressions in it. You know gonna fall asleep.

Roger Love:
If you don't make the sounds that showcase how sweet little red riding hood is, (Roger reads the following sentence with varying melody and tone). "Little red riding hood is going to the forest. She's got a bonnet and she's going to deliver fruit and a bread basket to her grandmother and she comes across this Wolf and the Wolf has one thing in his mind. He's hungry and the Wolf said..."

Roger Love:
So if you can't establish in your story who the good guys and bad guys are with sound, then it's like (Roger reads with a flat monotone) little red riding hood is little red riding hood. We don't care about her. And t her grandmother's hungry and we don't care about her. The Wolf comes and we don't care about him...and then we don't, so we don't care. You just don't care. You can give me all the facts, but I just don't care. I just don't want to be one of those kinds of people. I help people understand how to sound so that everything that they talk about other people care.

Lalit:
That's awesome Roger. Roger, we've covered a lot of ground. I'm very grateful. I want to ask you some fun questions, we've maybe talked about this before, but was there a particularly embarrassing moment in your life that.

Roger Love:
Every day (Roger laughing)

Lalit:
That you turned around and made it work for your advantage or particular failure? We actually kind of talked about it, but I don't know if you can think of another one.

 

Roger Love:
I think there's an inside voice and an outside voice. The Inside voice is that voice that wakes me up in the morning and says, inside my head without any sound and my mouth is closed, and inside my head, and I hear "you're Roger" and then I say, "okay, yeah, yeah. Check".

Roger Love:
Then your inside voice says. "That's your wife laying next to you" and.

Roger Love:
I'm like, check. "

Roger Love:
That's your dog laying on the, on the bottom there."

Roger Love:
Inside voice "Yes. Dog shouldn't probably be on the bed. Yes. It's Tuesday. You got to get up." That's the voice inside that keeps me sane. If that voice stops, I'm insane. I don't know my reality from from a lack of reality. So that's the inside voice. Then there's an outside voice that when you open your mouth, sound comes out. And when sound comes out, I say that's not for your consumption. That's for public consumption. When sound comes out, that's for everyone else to hear. So, basically when you live as a person who has their outside voice come out, which is we all should. Plenty of times, there are embarrassing things that come out because you're so in the moment that these things come out of your mouth. So I would just say I have a history of saying plenty and plenty of things that I'm embarrassed about, but I'd still rather live with my outside voice and share with people and let them use their outside voice when they communicate with me so that we can live out and perfectly imperfect. So I'm embarrassed every day, at least several times because I am perfectly imperfect.

Lalit:
Perfect. If you were to put a quote or a life lesson on a big billboard for the world to see, what would you put on it?

Roger Love:
Your voice is the most powerful communication tool you have.

Roger Love:
Nice. Yeah.

Roger Love:
It would definitely have voice in it.

Roger Love:
Absolutely.

Roger Love:
It might be "You're not the voice you are born with."

Roger Love:
Yes, That would be totally another one. I think many people feel they're stuck with their voice if you think about how it hinders your personal relationships and many people will never tell another person, "honey, you know, I can't stand your voice." Right? I mean, how do you tell somebody that?

Roger Love:
Right? They'd rather not kiss them. They'd rather not have sexual relations with the person. They'd rather spend time away from that person as opposed to saying, "honey, your voice is... you sound so sad all the time. That's making me sad. Your voice sounds so harsh all the time. It's making me feel bad. Your voice is so quiet. I can't really hear you. Your voice isn't making me feel romantic because your voice is coming across as all weak." So instead of having those conversations about the sounds you're making and those sounds are making me feel a certain way. We kibosh talking about those things. It's again, "do we really want to live inside voice-out or do we want to live outside voice-out?

Lalit:
Do you have a morning routine that you follow?

Roger Love:
Yeah, I get up in the morning and the first thing I think is I'm the luckiest person in the world.

Lalit:
Nice.

Roger Love:
I literally say I'm alive. This is an amazing day because I woke up and already to me as Pollyanna as that may sound. When I'm my eyes open in the morning, I'm thinking today is going to be amazing. First of all because I'm alive. So now I walk into the day thinking I'm either going to make something amazing happen or something amazing is going to happen to me. Either way I'm alive and something amazing. That's amazing already. So something great is going to happen today. So my routine is I get up, I take the dog out. That's my second mention of, of Gigi. I take the dog out and my bladder is not what it used to be, so I have to visit the bathroom. When I was younger, I could sometimes lay in bed and think I'm never getting up. But now the bladder says, "get up, you're older. "And then I either exercise, I go downstairs, I exercise. Or if that's not one of my exercise day, then I, jump in the shower and get ready to make something amazing happen during that day.

Roger Love:
Do you do your vocal warm ups in the morning?

Roger Love:
I'm doing vocal warm of so much during the day because I'm singing along with everyone else who comes in here. On an average day I'm doing vocal warm ups with people for hours, and on days that I have something where I'm going to do a lecture, I'm going to be on a podcast, then I would warm up my voice on the way to wherever I want on my voice to sound great. I would warm it up. And the good thing is, is my daily warm ups are minutes, five, six, seven minutes. Your voice can be warmed up the entire day. I'm not asking you to be a concert pianist and practice your voice for 8 to 10 hours to make a change. I'm saying, "hey, could you spend a few minutes doing these warm up exercises, which I've designed for my whole life, to make a big difference in a few minutes. And then the sounds that are going to come out of you all day are really going to help you achieve the things you wanted from that day.

Lalit:
That's what I like about your work is that the tools are so simple to use and they make like you get such a, the rate of return is incredible.

Roger Love:
Thank you.

Lalit:
Do you have a favorite book that you've gifted or you gift to people?

Roger Love:
Yes, I do. Since I was little, my favorite gift book is called 'The Missing Piece Meets the Big O' big O, by Shel Silverstein. This book is about a triangle who doesn't fit in any place, and he, he keeps trying to fit into something else. But, he's just a little triangle. And he wanders through life trying to fit in, but he only fits in a little bit. And then, and then his environment outgrows him. And then eventually that little triangle picks himself up and he doesn't even know he or she can, and flips over and picks himself up and flips over and it eventually wears off the edges of the triangle. And at the end of the story is now that triangle has become a circle and he or she can roll along with the other circle and both have a complete life. And I think a lot of us think that we're missing all of these. We have these rough edges and we can't roll and we're trying to fit into other people's lives, making them think that they make us complete. But the goal, the moral of this story is you got to make yourself complete and then you can share life with friends, lovers, relationships, businesses and ideas. But you have to be a whole circle before you can really hang out with a lot of other whole circles.

 

Lalit:
You know what, I don't think there's anything else after that. That is beautifully said. I think this would be a good place to stop the questioning, but you have something very special for the listeners. And I was wondering if you have an ask for the audience, or for people who are listening on the podcast?

Roger Love:
I came with gift. I've just spent my whole life and then a year creating my next program, which is called the Voice of Healing for Healthcare Professionals. And I've taken everything I've learned about voice and everything that I've learned from working with the top doctors, nurses and health providers and put it into a program, an online program where you can really learn about voice and communication no matter what level you're at in healthcare. And it's not even available to the public yet. And I would be honoured to offer it to your listeners for a $100 discount from the cost that it's going to be available to the public soon - as a bonus. I’ve they've spent so many years and so much heart is involved in the healthcare business and now let me give them something back that will make them communicate how much they really do know and how much they really care. How to make teams work and how to make organizations work all-around health.  How to make the patients feel great and make other healthcare professionals around them love it.

Lalit: (Audio Insert)
If you are interested in Roger's Voice of Healing program go to
www.rogerlove.com/lalit and you'll get that discount. Enter HEAL in the Promo Code under “have a promo code” and the $100 discount will be applied at the checkout. Now back to the interview.

Roger Love:
For those of your listeners that are really serious about taking healthcare and the communications that they, the sounds that come out of them and the way they feel about themselves and the way that everyone else feels about them, this would be the next step. Better than some certification, better than reading another book. Take the opportunity to, to realize that your voice should lead you to the next level of loving being a part of healthcare.

Lalit:
I'll put all the links for that in the show notes. So we’ll provide it. You also have a gift because not everybody is going to be a healthcare professional who would sign up for that. Do you have anything for them?

Roger Love:
Yes. I, for the last 30 years have been trying to figure out exactly what someone needs to know for their speaking voice, to have the personal and business life that they want and to create the self-confidence they want in life in general. And, and my program is called The Perfect Voice Collection. And, I'm also gonna offer a really sizable discount on that to anyone that's maybe outside of the healthcare profession but realizes that after hearing what we've talked about, that you're going to need a vocal, makeover to be the next level of a person that you want to be, to make a difference in your life and in the lives of everyone that you come in contact with. To be a parent and to be able to showcase and help your kids learn, to have a voice that establishes their success in life, to be able to have a voice that makes your patient, your, makes, your, your partner want to hear you and brings the kind of relationships you want to be able to have a voice that allows you to create the kind of business situations you want and showcase the best of who you are. That's the perfect voice. And I'll make that absolutely, readily accessible to your listeners as well and give them a sizable discount.

Lalit:
That's not even very expensive. So thank you for the discount. If you're not a healthcare professional but want to take your voice and communication skills to the next level go to
www.theperfectvoice.com/buy and enter the code VOICE and get $50 dollars off for the complete collection, making it only $97 dollars. I've completed this course and I loved it.

Roger Love:
This is nothing. This is a handful of times you're going into Starbucks and you’re eating and drinking, all of those things that have more sugar than you should probably use. Anyways.

Lalit:
I found that the program exceptionally helpful. It elevated my game on the speaking circuit and just connecting. So thank you for that. Thank you for the discount. Oh, that's awesome. So I will have all of that in the show notes and the links will be there. And you know, Roger, it has been a super treat to be with you here again and to you see again and just visit. Thank you for doing the podcast. Thank you so much.

Roger Love:
I'm so proud of you for using your voice to make the world a better place. And, and I listen to your podcast and I approve of this message. You're doing an amazing job helping a lot of people and so it's an honour for me to be with you and I'm really, really proud of the way you're using your voice.

Lalit:
Thank you Roger.

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